Our Collection

NMAD's artifact collection is unique to the nation. At over 9,000 items, the collection reflects a wide range of people, places, and issues that make up our nation's rich diplomatic history. Collecting efforts are ongoing as we build a world-class collection.

Collection

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2019 Collections Highlights
Telephone set, State Department Operations Center 1980s-2011
Diplomacy never sleeps nor takes a day off. To maintain 24/7 worldwide communications, the Department of State has an Operations Center staffed by highly skilled diplomats and crisis management experts to meet any worldwide challenge. This included monitoring the launches and returns of NASA Space Shuttles. During this era, as NASA prepared to launch crews from Cape Kennedy in Florida, a small team of diplomats in Washington, DC, also gathered at the State Department Operations Center during each launch. Their role was to help facilitate emergency landings of the shuttle overseas, should it be necessary. With a special phone that connected to mission control -- such as this one, now part of NMAD's collection -- the team was also connected to backup landing sites in various countries around the world in Europe, Africa, and Asia. If an emergency landing was needed, the State Department would have quickly informed the country involved and would work to obtain assistance from that country to return the astronaut and the capsule. While an actual emergency landing never occurred, State played a vital role in making sure the bilateral agreements for these sites were in place and enabled use at a moment’s notice.
Commission Appointment of Edward R. Dudley as Ambassador to Liberia 1949
In 1948, President Truman appointed Edward R. Dudley to serve as U.S. Minister to Liberia. Dudley was a civil rights lawyer from New York who worked at the NAACP with Thurgood Marshall and later as legal counsel to the Governor of the United States Virgin Islands. At the time of Dudley’s appointment, the U.S. Government represented its interests through a legation in Monrovia. In 1949, Truman decided to elevate the legation to an embassy and appointed Mr. Dudley as the U.S. Ambassador to Liberia, thus becoming the first African American to be named a U.S. Ambassador. Ambassador Dudley influenced significant changes in the Foreign Service for African American officers. At the time, black FSOs were relegated to overseas assignments in what was pejoratively called the "Negro circuit." These were posts in "black, hardship, disagreeable" places -- as Dudley referred to them -- including Monrovia, Liberia, Ponta del Gada, Portugal, and Madagascar. Upon arrival in Monrovia, Mr. Dudley realized that this situation was not only unfair but also against the policies of the Foreign Service. He wrote a detailed report to the State Department, citing specific examples and statistics to make the case that black FSOs were being treated unfairly and that the State Department was in violation of its policies. This memo, as well as Ambassador Dudley's direct communication with officials in Washington, led to the breaking up of the "Negro circuit" and more opportunities for black FSOs to serve in a wider variety of posts, employing their skills and knowledge around the world. Dudley later recounted that he felt this was "... probably one of the more important things that I did the whole time I was there." After his service in Liberia, Dudley continued his legal career and was later appointed to the New York Supreme Court.
Diplomatic Passport, issued to Tom Gallagher 2007
During most of the 20th century, personnel policies of the Department of State were hostile to individuals who did not identify as heterosexual. Employees who were not considered “straight” were deemed a security risk and were systematically investigated and forced to resign. This was true throughout the federal government. Starting in the mid-1970s, rules for the federal Civil Service prohibited such practices, however these did not apply to the military or to the Foreign Service. Tom Gallagher joined the Foreign Service in 1965, his first assignment was Vice Consul in Saudi Arabia. Ten years later while posted domestically, he came out as an openly gay Foreign Service Officer while speaking at a conference on gays in the federal government in Washington DC. It is believed that he is the first FSO to do so. Tom assumed that he would get his security clearance revoked and subsequently lose his job due to his coming out. He served one more assignment in Ecuador after coming out publicly. However, he resigned after this post knowing that his security clearance would be in jeopardy once he was required to go through the regular process of renewal. Tom moved to California and started a new career as a social worker. Nearly 20 years later in 1994, President Bill Clinton prohibited personnel and security policies that were hostile toward homosexuals in the Foreign Service. Tom decided to return to his beloved career as a Foreign Service Officer. His first assignment was Chief of the Visa Section at U.S. Embassy Madrid, Spain. While serving there, Tom helped raise $3 million for the Spanish AIDS Foundation. He also served as Country Officer for Eritrea and Sudan at the State Department, and as Chief of the Visa Section at U.S. Embassy Brussels, Belgium. His final tours at the State Department were with the Office of International Health, where he served as a Senior Advisor and worked on international AIDS programs, and as Country Officer, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania and Uganda. After retiring in 2005, Gallagher continued to serve short temporary tours for the State Department including assignments at 17 embassies and consulates on five continents. This Diplomatic Passport is from this era of his service. “...remember that all of the employees who sacrificed their right to be who they were, were really defending your rights and the rights and freedoms of others at home and abroad.” -- Remarks by Secretary of State Hilary Clinton, GLIFAA* 20th anniversary, November 2012, after honoring Tom Gallagher. *Employee affinity group Gays and Lesbians in Foreign Affairs Agencies
Beret and Cross, gifts to Kathryn Koob 1981
The Iran hostage crisis of 1979-1981 ranks as one of the most traumatic diplomatic challenges in U.S. history. The U.S. Embassy in Tehran became a visible target during the political revolution by Islamic fundamentalists against the pro-American Iranian leader Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. Animosity towards westerners, and Americans in particular who had [because they had]? backed the Shah, had been building for over a year. On November 4, 1979, Iranian student militants scaled the U.S. embassy compound’s walls, seized control of the embassy, and forcibly detained the American staff. Kathryn Koob was a Foreign Service Officer serving as the director of the Iran-American Society, a nonprofit organization established by the U.S. government to foster educational and community ties between the two countries. She arrived in Tehran just four months before the American embassy was seized by Iranian militants on Nov. 4, 1979. From her office two miles away, she relayed information to Washington for a day before she, too, was captured. She became one of two women who were held hostage during the entire ordeal. Kathryn is a person of deep faith, which sustained her while held captive. "The idea of a contemplative lifestyle intrigued me. What would it be like? Here was my opportunity to find out," she recounted in her 1982 book Guest of the Revolution. To accomplish this, she maintained a daily schedule of prayer and contemplation. Kate also became close friends with Ann Swift, her fellow female hostage who was the embassy’s deputy political counselor. Through negotiations brokered by Algeria, a deal securing the hostages’ release was achieved on January 19, 1981. The next day, they were flown immediately to Algeria and then to Germany for medical treatment at the U.S. Air Force base in Weisbaden. After a few days, they returned to the United States and were welcomed home with great fanfare. Kate and the other freed Americans received many gifts upon their return to the United States. Kate received this beret and silver cross which represents her strong resilient spirit in spite of the prolonged captivity.
2018 Collections Highlight
U.S. Flag U.S. Embassy Nairobi, Kenya
This flag graced the office of Colonel Ron Roughead, Chief of the U.S. Liaison Office in Kenya, at U.S. Embassy Nairobi. On August 7, 1998, in coordinated attacks by al Qaeda terrorists, U.S. Embassies Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, were devastated by car bombs. Embassy Nairobi and the surrounding neighborhood suffered extensive damage and loss of life. After the attack, the Embassy Nairobi Marine Security Guards made an initial sweep of the embassy building searching for survivors and recovering victims. The Marines found this flag in Colonel Roughead’s office along with a roll of masking tape. Knowing that the flag on the pole outside the entrance to the Embassy had been blown off by the blast, they taped this flag to the exterior window frame. During the initial days after the attack, it was a symbol that the U.S. embassy and the personnel were still standing proudly even though they had been hit very hard. Colonel Roughead kept the flag exactly as it was when it was taken down, including the masking tape. He displayed the flag outside his home on every anniversary of the bombing, as well as every Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day and 4th of July. In donating this flag to the Diplomacy Center, he expressed his hope that it gives inspiration to our nation’s diplomats and military serving on the front lines. Gift of Colonel Ron Roughead
Fan, Postcard, and Photographs from the George W. Guthrie Collection 1913-1917
Fan A dinner party gift to Florence Guthrie during Coronation week celebrations. Postcard A commemorative postcard celebrating the coronation of the Emperor Taisho in November 1915. Photographs Portraits of Ambassador George Guthrie and his wife Florence on the occasion of the coronation of the Emperor Taisho. George W. Guthrie served as U.S. Ambassador to Japan (1913-1917) and as Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (1906-1909). As ambassador, he kept the U.S-Japan bilateral relationship on an even keel as war spread into Asia and the Pacific in 1914 and as President Woodrow Wilson attempted to maintain neutrality. Additional tensions with the bilateral relationship also mounted during this time. The Japanese government was extremely unhappy about the unfair treatment of Japanese immigrants in California. And the U.S. was making efforts to contain Japan's encroachment and potential economic control of territories in China. Guthrie and his wife Florence successfully managed this complex relationship, gaining high respect from the Japanese. They were invited to represent the United States at both the funeral of the Empress Dowager, widow of the Emperor Meiji, in April 1914, and the coronation of Emperor Taisho in November 1915. Guthrie unexpectedly died in March 1917 of apoplexy. The Japanese provided a warship to transport the beloved U.S. ambassador's body back to the United States. George and Florence Guthrie's great-great nephew Richard Tucker and his wife Lynne Tucker generously donated to the National Museum of American Diplomacy several remarkable artifacts representing the Guthrie's service in Japan. Gift of Lynn and Richard Tucker
Letter from Ambassador Adolph Dubs to his daughter Lindsay March 3, 1973
Adolph “Spike” Dubs was a career Foreign Service Officer and noted Soviet expert. In 1973-74 he served as charge d’affaires at Embassy Moscow, and in 1978, he was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. On February 14, 1979, Ambassador Dubs and his driver were stopped in their car by armed militants posing as police. They overpowered both of them and forced the driver to take them to the downtown Kabul Hotel. There they held Ambassador Dubs at gunpoint and demanded the release of a political prisoner. Despite pleas from U.S. officials to keep the situation as calm as possible while they tried to negotiate the ambassador's release, Afghan and accompanying Soviet officials hastily mounted a heavily armed rescue attempt. Ambassador Dubs was assassinated during the attempted rescue. The exact identity and motive of these kidnappers still remains a mystery. Ambassador Dubs was a prolific letter writer during his diplomatic career. He kept in close contact with his daughter Lindsay who was in her 20s during this time. He opened his correspondence with "My Dearest Lindsay," and relayed details of his official duties, conversations, and trips to local sites. He also dispensed fatherly advice, concern, and encouragement - all communicating how much he loved and missed her. Six years prior to Dubs’ assassination, U.S. Ambassador to Sudan Cleo Noel was kidnapped and assassinated by a terrorist group. Ambassador Dubs wrote to Lindsay on March 3, 1973, and included his thoughts about this tragedy. His words sadly predicted the same situation in which he would find himself in Kabul. He wrote: “...we cannot afford to give in to the ransom demands made by thugs who direct such organizations as the Black September Group. I personally don't like to think of being any kind of a martyr; but if I were ever taken in a situation such as that which occurred in Khartoum, I would want Washington to understand that I would rather sacrifice my life than to have someone capitulate to the demands of terrorists." The next time a U.S. ambassador was killed at post was in 2012, with the death of Ambassador Christopher Stevens in Benghazi, Libya. Gift of Adolph Dubs' Daughter, Lindsay
Letter from Ambassador Adolph Dubs to his daughter Lindsay March 3, 1973
Adolph “Spike” Dubs was a career Foreign Service Officer and noted Soviet expert. In 1973-74 he served as charge d’affaires at Embassy Moscow, and in 1978, he was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. On February 14, 1979, Ambassador Dubs and his driver were stopped in their car by armed militants posing as police. They overpowered both of them and forced the driver to take them to the downtown Kabul Hotel. There they held Ambassador Dubs at gunpoint and demanded the release of a political prisoner. Despite pleas from U.S. officials to keep the situation as calm as possible while they tried to negotiate the ambassador's release, Afghan and accompanying Soviet officials hastily mounted a heavily armed rescue attempt. Ambassador Dubs was assassinated during the attempted rescue. The exact identity and motive of these kidnappers still remains a mystery. Ambassador Dubs was a prolific letter writer during his diplomatic career. He kept in close contact with his daughter Lindsay who was in her 20s during this time. He opened his correspondence with "My Dearest Lindsay," and relayed details of his official duties, conversations, and trips to local sites. He also dispensed fatherly advice, concern, and encouragement - all communicating how much he loved and missed her. Six years prior to Dubs’ assassination, U.S. Ambassador to Sudan Cleo Noel was kidnapped and assassinated by a terrorist group. Ambassador Dubs wrote to Lindsay on March 3, 1973, and included his thoughts about this tragedy. His words sadly predicted the same situation in which he would find himself in Kabul. He wrote: “...we cannot afford to give in to the ransom demands made by thugs who direct such organizations as the Black September Group. I personally don't like to think of being any kind of a martyr; but if I were ever taken in a situation such as that which occurred in Khartoum, I would want Washington to understand that I would rather sacrifice my life than to have someone capitulate to the demands of terrorists." The next time a U.S. ambassador was killed at post was in 2012, with the death of Ambassador Christopher Stevens in Benghazi, Libya. Gift of Adolph Dubs' Daughter, Lindsay
Martin Van Buren's Secretary of State Commission
Martin Van Buren served as the 10th U.S. Secretary of State and the 8th President of the United States. He entered politics in 1813 and served as a New York state senator, a U.S. Senator, and later as New York governor. He resigned to join President Andrew Jackson’s cabinet as U.S. Secretary of State, serving from 1829 until 1831. Following his tenure as Secretary, Van Buren was elected Vice President under Jackson (1833-1837) and then was elected President, serving until 1841. His accomplishments as Secretary of State include a settlement with Great Britain to allow trade with the British West Indies, a settlement with France gaining reparations for property seized during the Napoleonic Wars, as well as a commercial treaty with the Ottoman Empire that granted U.S. traders access to the Black Sea. Van Buren’s Secretary of State commission is one of the oldest items in the Diplomacy Center collections. James Alexander Hamilton, the third son of founding father Alexander Hamilton, was acting Secretary of State at the time and signed this commission. Even today, the acting Secretary of State signs the incoming Secretary’s commission. Historically, several people have sought the presidency either before or after serving as Secretary of State. Martin Van Buren was one of six Secretaries of State to later successfully win the presidency. This includes: Thomas Jefferson; James Madison; James Monroe; John Quincy Adams; Martin Van Buren; and James Buchanan. Gift of the Kiplinger Family
Van Buren Engraving
Van Buren Engraving
Whitehouse passport
Sheldon Whitehouse, a career Foreign Service Officer, served as U.S. Minister to Guatemala (1929-1933) and to Colombia (1933-1934). Prior to these posts, he used this Special Passport to travel to his post at the U.S. Legation for Greece and Montenegro. The passport is signed by Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan. It was issued on June 30, 1914, just as war was about to break out in Europe. Special passports were issued to prominent officials traveling on government business. They were used during most of the 19th century and into the early 20th century. The Department of State adopted a “passeport diplomatique” in 1918 for officials traveling in the diplomatic service. Starting in 1926, currently serving diplomats as well as former ambassadors were issued Diplomatic Passports. Photographs were not required on U.S. passports until December 1914, and in the case of this passport, would have been added later if the passport was first issued before this date. A description of the bearer’s physical features is also attached on the upper left front side that includes details such as the shape of his forehead and chin, and the color of his eyes and hair. Whitehouse used this passport from 1914 to 1918. It is stamped throughout, on both sides, and additional pages were attached to the right and lower sides to accommodate his many trips. Ambassador Whitehouse entered the Foreign Service in 1908, and served until 1935. His postings included American Embassies in London, Caracas, Paris (twice), Madrid, Athens and Montenegro, St. Petersburg, Stockholm, Washington DC (Chief of the Near Eastern Division), Guatemala, and Colombia. He was witness to major post-WWI efforts to secure peace in Europe. As Counselor of the U.S. Legation in Sweden in 1919, Whitehouse was a participant in the American Commission to Negotiate Peace at Paris. In 1927, as Counselor of the embassy and Charge d’Affaires in Paris, he facilitated early discussions that would result in the Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928. The Whitehouse family has a long legacy of public service. Sheldon Whitehouse’s son Charles, a career FSO, served as U.S. Ambassador to Laos (1973-1975) and Thailand (1975-1978). His son-in-law Robert Orris Blake, a career FSO, served as U.S. Ambassador to Mali (1970-1973). His grandson Robert Blake Jr., a career FSO, served as U.S. Ambassador to Maldives and Sri Lanka (2006-2009), Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs (2009-2013), and U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia (2013-2016). His grandson Sheldon Whitehouse currently serves as a U.S. Senator for Rhode Island.
2017 Collections Highlights
Cookbook, Operation Vittles
Compiled by the American Women in Blockaded Berlin, January 1949, as part of an effort to pool ideas and recipes using the limited resources available to them at the time.
Newspaper, The Independent Gazetteer
This original August 3, 1789 issue of The Independent Gazetteer or the Chronicle of Freedom provides notice of and complete text of the July 27, 1789 act establishing the Department of Foreign Affairs. The Gazetteer was published in Philadelphia from 1782-1790.
Fire Helmet
Department of State Special Agent credentials
Issued to Joseph M. Nye, March 26, 1920. The first Chief Special Agent for the State Department was Joseph Nye, a former Secret Service agent. Nye had a distinguished tenure and stepped down in May 1920. His Office of Security later became the Bureau of Diplomatic Security.
Department of State Special Agent credentials
Issued to Joseph M. Nye, March 26, 1920. The first Chief Special Agent for the State Department was Joseph Nye, a former Secret Service agent. Nye had a distinguished tenure and stepped down in May 1920. His Office of Security later became the Bureau of Diplomatic Security.
Booklet, Soviet World Outlook, 1959
Soviet World Outlook: A Handbook of Communist Statements Published by the U.S. Department of State, July 1959 This booklet was a resource utilized by staff of the interagency committee called the Active Measures Working Group, which began work at the Department of State in the early 1980s. The Working Group was devoted to analyses of and responses to Soviet disinformation campaigns aimed at discrediting or weakening the United States and its allies.
Diplomatic License Plates
License plates for the foreign diplomatic community in the United States, issued circa 1984 The Office of Foreign Missions at the Department of State is mandated to ensure that all diplomatic benefits, privileges, and immunities are properly exercised in accordance with federal laws and international agreements. This mandate includes providing a range of services to the foreign diplomatic community in the United States, including issuance of vehicle titles, vehicle registrations, driver's licenses, and license plates. This full set of diplomatic license plates (Diplomat, Consular, and Staff) were issued circa 1984 and replaced in October 2007 with the current design.
Fulbright Briefcase (front)
2006 Named after a freshman U.S. senator from Arkansas, the Fulbright Program is a prestigious international educational exchange program supported both by Congress and partner foreign nations. More than 1,000 Nigerians have participated in the Fulbright program over the years. This briefcase is from a Fulbright Alumni Association of Nigeria conference in February 2006 at Bayero University in Kano (northern Nigeria).
Cardinal's Missal
U.S. Embassy Budapest, Hungary, 1956-1971 Cardinal Jozsef Mindszenty was the highest Catholic official in Hungary mid-20th century during the Soviet takeover of Hungary. He was opposed to communism and sentenced with treason. His life was in danger, and he sought and received asylum at the U.S. Embassy, Budapest on November 4, 1956. He ended up staying at the embassy and never leaving for 15 years. With the diplomatic assistance of the Vatican, he finally left in September 1971 to seek medical treatment. He utilized this missal while in residence at the embassy.
Manual, Japanese
Advanced Japanese: A Guide to Speaking on Formal Occasions Foreign Service Institute, Yokohama, 1989 The Japanese Language and Area Training Center, commonly known as FSI Yokohama, teaches advanced Japanese to Foreign Service Officers preparing to serve in Japan. Following language training, graduates move on to the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo or one of the five U.S. consulates in Japan. This manual is part of the curriculum offered at FSI Yokohama.
Manual, Japanese
Advanced Japanese: A Guide to Speaking on Formal Occasions Foreign Service Institute, Yokohama, 1989 The Japanese Language and Area Training Center, commonly known as FSI Yokohama, teaches advanced Japanese to Foreign Service Officers preparing to serve in Japan. Following language training, graduates move on to the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo or one of the five U.S. consulates in Japan. This manual is part of the curriculum offered at FSI Yokohama.
Travel Itinerary
President Carter to Egypt, 1979 In the late 1970s after decades of war, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli President Menachem Begin sought a peaceful resolution to the conflict between their neighboring countries. As part of this effort, President and Mrs. Carter traveled to Egypt on March 9, 1979, to meet with President and Mrs. Sadat. They traveled by a specially chartered Egyptian Railways train from Cairo to Alexandria and stayed in the Ras-al-Tin Palace.
Fulbright Briefcase (back)
2006 Named after a freshman U.S. senator from Arkansas, the Fulbright Program is a prestigious international educational exchange program supported both by Congress and partner foreign nations. More than 1,000 Nigerians have participated in the Fulbright program over the years. This briefcase is from a Fulbright Alumni Association of Nigeria conference in February 2006 at Bayero University in Kano (northern Nigeria).
Challenge Coin
2013 Kabul, Afghanistan Tragedy struck a diplomatic delegation and their military escorts on April 6, 2013, in southern Afghanistan. A young diplomat named Anne Smedinghoff, three U.S. soldiers, and an Afghani interpreter were killed in a car bomb blast that targeted their group as they were delivering books to a boys' school. Anne was a 25-year-old Foreign Service Officer working in the Public Affairs Section of U.S. Embassy Kabul. Her group was on their way to deliver a donation of Pashto language books to the school in Qalat, Zabul Province, Afghanistan. In remembrance, the embassy created a challenge coin in Anne's honor and a plaque which hung at the embassy. These books are copies of the same books that Anne's group was delivering that day. Transfer from the U.S. Embassy Kabul, Afghanistan
Plaque
2013 Kabul, Afghanistan Tragedy struck a diplomatic delegation and their military escorts on April 6, 2013, in southern Afghanistan. A young diplomat named Anne Smedinghoff, three U.S. soldiers, and an Afghani interpreter were killed in a car bomb blast that targeted their group as they were delivering books to a boys' school. Anne was a 25-year-old Foreign Service Officer working in the Public Affairs Section of U.S. Embassy Kabul. Her group was on their way to deliver a donation of Pashto language books to the school in Qalat, Zabul Province, Afghanistan. In remembrance, the embassy created a challenge coin in Anne's honor and a plaque which hung at the embassy. These books are copies of the same books that Anne's group was delivering that day. Transfer from the U.S. Embassy Kabul, Afghanistan
Pen, U.S.-China Agreements
1979 Washington, DC Following the warming of U.S. and Chinese relations ushered in during the Nixon administration, President Carter announced in December 1978 that the U.S. would establish official diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China (PRC). The U.S. would recognize the PRC as the sole legal government of China and withdraw diplomatic recognition from Taiwan (also known as the Republic of China [ROC]). As part of this historic opening, Vice-Premier Deng Xiaoping of the PRC came to Washington, DC, for a State visit with President Carter in January 1979. On January 29, the two leaders signed an Agreement on Cooperation in Science and Technology and a Cultural Agreement. Additional agreements were signed covering areas such as education, agriculture, and space exploration. These agreements paved way for the opening embassies and consulates and the exchange of ambassadors between the two countries. Herb Hansell was the Legal Adviser at the U.S. Department of State from 1977-1979. He played a key role in framing these agreements and in carrying out the signing ceremonies. One of his duties included providing the pen for the president to use at the signing ceremony. This pen was used by President Carter to sign the China agreements on January 29, 1979. Gift of the Herb Hansell Family
Charred Great Seal
2008 U.S. Embassy Belgrade Protesters in Belgrade, Serbia, attacked and set fire to the U.S. embassy on February 21, 2008, in response to U.S. support for Kosovo's independence. A large rally of Serbs, vowing to retake the neighboring territory which is viewed as Serbia's religious and national heartland, preceded the attack on the embassy. After the attack, the embassy was temporarily closed and some embassy community members were temporarily relocated to Croatia. The Government of Serbia still considers Kosovo to be part of its territory and has not recognized Kosovo’s independence, although more than 100 countries have done so. In 1999, the U.S. broke off relations with the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY), a predecessor state that included Serbia, when the FRY launched an ethnic cleansing and deportation campaign against noncombatant ethnic Albanians. This was followed by a bombing campaign of the FRY by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) that lasted nearly 78 days until the FRY Government agreed to allow the establishment of a United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) and the NATO-led Kosovo Force (KFOR), which allowed displaced persons and refugees to return to their homes. After a UN-backed process to determine the province’s future status, Kosovo declared its independence from Serbia in 2008, which the U.S. recognized but Serbia rejected. (see rs.usembassy.gov/our-relationship/policy-history/us-count...) Transfer from the U.S. Embassy Belgrade, Serbia
U.S. Flag, Damaged
1998 U.S. Embassy Guinea-Bissau Hostilities broke out in and around the capital of Guinea-Bissau in 1998 between rebel forces and government troops. Rebel forces led by a former head of the armed forces, Brigadier Ansumane Mane, launched a rebellion against the government army. The fighting forced the evacuation of American private citizens from the country and eventually the full evacuation of all American employees at the U.S. embassy and the closure of the embassy. The embassy compound sustained damage during the fighting. This flag is believed to be the last U.S. flag flown over the embassy and the damage to the flag is likely due to the fighting. Today, all official U.S. contact with Guinea-Bissau is handled by the U.S. Embassy in Senegal. Local employees staff the U.S. Liaison Office in Bissau, and U.S. diplomats from Embassy Dakar travel frequently to Bissau. Transfer from U.S. Embassy Dakar, Senegal
Vehicle Pass, Iraqi National Elections
2005 Iraq This Iraqi Ministry of Interior vehicle placard was attached to authorized U.S. embassy vehicles, allowing them to drive near polling stations during the Iraqi National Legislative Elections in December 2005. Following the ratification of the Constitution of Iraq on October 15, 2005, a general election was held on December 15 to elect a permanent 275-member Iraqi Council of Representatives. In emerging democracies, U.S. diplomats participate with international coalitions to monitor the election process and polling places on election day. The United States supports the right of citizens everywhere to choose their leaders in elections that are free, fair, and transparent. Transfer from the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, Office of Iraq Affairs
Collage, Citizen Diplomacy
2011 National Council of International Visitors 50th anniversary The concept of citizen diplomacy dates as far back as 1956 when President Eisenhower hosted a White House Summit on Citizen Diplomacy. Citizen diplomacy is an opportunity for the individual citizen to help shape foreign relations “one handshake at a time” as is often noted by citizen diplomats. This original artwork features a collage of images, logos, and quotes that celebrate 50 years of the National Council of International Visitors (NCIV), a private organization that promotes citizen diplomacy in the U.S. The NCIV is now known as Global Ties U.S. Then as now, it is a network of individual members, program agencies, and community organizations throughout the U.S. that serves as the private sector partner to the U.S. Department of State's Office of International Visitors. U.S. Embassies and Consulates select emerging leaders to participate in the International Visitor Leadership Program. Participants come to the U.S. for training, to meet counterparts, and to participate in discussions with officials and regular citizens. It is this network of citizen diplomats, activated through Global Ties U.S. (formerly NCIV), that organizes their U.S. experiences across the country. International Visitors come from all sectors of society, from agriculture to journalism, from health care to government. Citizen diplomats create an enriching experience for these emerging leaders. This collage features a ceramic "NCIV" coaster at the center top of the artwork. These were distributed as 50th anniversary gifts. The phrase "Make Friends, Make Contacts, Make Peace" at the center right of the artwork was the tagline for the Philadelphia Citizen Diplomacy Council. The phrase "You welcomed a stranger and sent home a friend" at the lower right of the artwork was said by an alumna from India. The phrase "One handshake at a time" at the center left of the artwork is the motto for the Santa Fe New Mexico Council on International Relations. The logo "COSERV" in the lower left of the artwork (shaped like the USA, purple with white lettering) was the original name of the NCIV in 1961. It stood for Community Services to International Visitors. The collage artist is David Newman of Prescott, Arizona. His aim with this colorful piece was to showcase the intersection of America and international exchange programs -- specifically the International Visitor Leadership Program - and the building of a global perspective one citizen at a time. Gift of Sherry Lee Mueller
Caps, U.S. Navy
Late 20th century (various) Foreign Service Officer Emil Skodon served at a number of posts that supported port visits by U.S. Navy ships. In appreciation for his help, he received caps with the ships’ names from the captains of these visiting ships. This simple token illustrates an important aspect of how our nation's military and diplomats work together and rely on each for support. The U.S. embassy or consulate at a port of call provides diplomatic clearances for vessels and coordinates between the ship's crew and the community. The mission also assists in arranging meetings between the ship's captain and local authorities, refueling and re-provisioning the ship, and briefing the crew about the lay of the land prior to disembarking on their R&R. Gift of Ambassador (Ret.) Emil Skodon
Poster, Amerika Haus Frankfurt
2002 Germany In divided Germany after World War II, the United States established the “Amerika Häuser” (America House) program as part of the American military government’s efforts to re-familiarize the German population with western ideals of democracy and human rights after twelve years of Nazi domination. The new Amerika Haus in Frankfurt and those established in other German cities were the foundation of what some later called the “Marshall Plan of Ideas” – a U.S. public diplomacy initiative that set a standard for later programs around the globe. This poster features a drawing by German artist Werner Krömeke of Amerika Haus Frankfurt, located at Rothschild Park where it opened in May 1957. The publication of this poster was part a publicity initiative in 2002 for Amerika Haus. Throughout its history, Amerika Haus presented prominent American intellectuals, writers, and artists. Offerings at Amerika Haus included exhibitions, concerts, readings, lectures, panel discussions, seminars, conferences, exchange program information, and other services for the foreign public. Amerika Haus closed as a separate entity and its functions were relocated to the new U.S. consulate building on Gießener Straße in Frankfurt-Eckenheim on September 29, 2005. All programs and activities formerly conducted at Amerika Haus are continuing uninterrupted as part of the Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Consulate General Frankfurt. The traditional library has evolved into a state-of-the-art Information Resource Center, which provides electronic access to a range of background materials on the United States. The old Amerika Haus building in Frankfurt is now operated by the Cervantes Institute. Gift of Pamela Dragovich, Foreign Service Specialist (Retired)
Pen, Used to Sign the Declarations of Algiers
1981 Algiers, Algeria On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants forcefully took over the U.S. Embassy Tehran and ultimately held over 50 Americans hostage for 444 days. Negotiations between the U.S. and Iran for the release of the hostages were brokered through the Foreign Ministry of Algeria. The Declarations of Algiers was a set of agreements that secured the release of the American hostages in Tehran on January 20, 1981. Harold Saunders was the Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs at the Department of State at the time and played a key role in finding a resolution to this crisis. On the way to the signing of the agreements at the Foreign Ministry in Algiers, Deputy Secretary of State Warren Christopher said to Saunders, “Give me your pen for good luck.” He used Saunders’ pen to sign this historic document. After the freed hostages arrived in Algiers, Saunders flew with them to Weisbaden, Germany, where they received medical care before returning to the U.S. a few days later. Warren Christopher returned Saunders’ pen to him in a presentation box with a photograph. The inscription on the photograph reads: To Hal Saunders – my hands, your pen. With my admiration, affection, and appreciation. February 1981 Warren Christopher Gift of Carol (Mrs. Harold H.) Saunders
Tribal Hat and Sash
2013 Nigeria Through a partnership between the Tokbet Community Development Association and U.S. Mission Nigeria’s Small Grants Program, a remote Nigerian community now has a health clinic providing vital services to residents. The Tokbet Community Clinic provides maternity care, prenatal checkups, HIV/AIDS testing, counseling, and treatment. At the opening ceremony for the clinic, Tokbet community leaders adorned Deputy Chief of Mission James P. McAnulty in the traditional attire of a Tokbet leader in honor of his visit. He wore the sash and hat as he and community leaders lead a procession to the clinic for the ribbon cutting ceremony. U.S. Mission Nigeria’s Small Grants Program supports U.S. foreign policy aims in the country, such as the implementation of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Gift of James P. McAnulty
Signed Copy of House Resolution 786
Foreign Service Commission, William K. Payeff
October 7, 1968 France William K. Payeff was a career Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. Information Agency. Prior to his diplomatic service, he served in the army during World War II and participated in the D-Day invasion of France. He was awarded a bronze star for bravery. His Foreign Service commission is unusual in that multiple positions are listed for his service at U.S. Embassy Paris: Foreign Service Information Officer, Consular Officer, and Secretary in the Diplomatic Service. Gift of Beverly Payeff-Masey
Anne Smedinghoff's Books
2013 Kabul, Afghanistan Tragedy struck a diplomatic delegation and their military escorts on April 6, 2013, in southern Afghanistan. A young diplomat named Anne Smedinghoff, three U.S. soldiers, and an Afghani interpreter were killed in a car bomb blast that targeted their group as they were delivering books to a boys' school. Anne was a 25-year-old Foreign Service Officer working in the Public Affairs Section of U.S. Embassy Kabul. Her group was on their way to deliver a donation of Pashto language books to the school in Qalat, Zabul Province, Afghanistan. In remembrance, the embassy created a challenge coin in Anne's honor and a plaque which hung at the embassy. These books are copies of the same books that Anne's group was delivering that day. Transfer from the U.S. Embassy Kabul, Afghanistan
Isuzu Trooper Grille
1989 Used in Nairobi 1998 On August 7, 1998, Al-Qaeda terrorists set off coordinated deadly car bombs outside U.S. Embassy Nairobi, Kenya, and U.S. Embassy Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The death and destruction at both sites was extreme. In Nairobi, U.S. Ambassador Prudence Bushnell suffered injuries as she was meeting with officials in a neighboring building that was damaged in the blast. Due to the destruction and confusion, local first responders were not able to immediately access the bombed embassy site in Nairobi. Foreign Service couple Worley and Joyce Reed were two of several employees who found themselves within or near the site and jumped into action trying to help get their fellow coworkers out. Their personal vehicle, an Isuzu Trooper, was soon turned into a makeshift ambulance. Joyce guided injured American and Kenyan employees to her car and their driver drove them to the Nairobi Hospital. The driver returned for a second load of injured employees. Their car became the first “ambulance” in use immediately after the blast, before actual ambulances were able to reach the site. The Isuzu Trooper is a sturdy four-wheel drive vehicle popular with Foreign Service families serving abroad. While serving in Nairobi, Worley (Lee) Reed was the head Security Engineering Officer at the U.S. embassy and Joyce was the Information Management Office Manager. They both received awards for heroism for these and other actions that day. Gift of Worley (Lee) Reed and Joyce A. Reed
Replica Makkah Royal Clock Tower
Gift of Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques Abdullah bin Abd al-Aziz Al Saud, King of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 11/3/2013 Trip to Saudi Arabia The Makkah Royal Clock Tower is the tallest tower in Saudi Arabia and overlooks the historic city center of Mecca. The tower is adjacent to the Grand Mosque and houses a hotel. During this trip to Saudi Arabia, Secretary of State John Kerry met with King Abdullah bin Abd al-Aziz Al Saud and Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal. They discussed topics of mutual concern in the region. Publicly, they emphasized the importance of the bilateral relationship and the enduring partnership between the two countries.
Painting, Ancient Tongan Royal Tombs
2016 Tonga The ancient royal tombs in Lapaha are central to Tonga's cultural heritage. The most ancient of these tombs were built around 1200 AD. In need of conservation, they are considered the most important historical and archaeological monument in the South Pacific. This painted depiction of the tombs was a gift to a Foreign Service Officer who helped secure financial assistance from the Department of State's Ambassadors Fund for Cultural Preservation. The Fund supports the preservation of cultural sites, cultural objects, and forms of traditional cultural expression in more than 100 countries around the world. Previous conservation work supported by the Ambassadors Fund for Cultural Preservation in 2012 resulted in the conservation of three multi-level tombs including the stabilization of more than 650 beach rock slabs weighing around 1000 tons by a local community workforce. The aim of the current AFCP project is to extend this successful conservation approach to two large royal tombs and eight smaller tombs associated with the main line of royal tombs. In addition to the conservation work, the project includes a local community education program to discuss the current status of the tombs and possible actions that the Lapaha community might take to manage and preserve the tombs in the future. Gift of Dmitri Tarakhovsky
Seal, United States Information Service
1999 Russia The United States Information Service (USIS) was the overseas arm of the U.S. Information Agency (USIA) -- the agency charged with carrying out our nation’s public diplomacy and exchange programs worldwide. USIA and USIS were merged with the Department of State in 1999. USIS offices overseas were folded into the Embassy’s public affairs sections, and today continue to carry out similar duties. Foreign Service Officer Eric Johnson was assigned to Moscow from 2000 to 2004 as the Information Resource Officer. After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the start of the conflict in Afghanistan, the entire public affairs team (USIS until October 1999) was quickly relocated from the old Embassy building located on a major street into a newer, more secure building. Periodically, members of the public affairs team would go back into the old building to salvage usable items – mostly furniture which ended up being donated to Russian libraries as part of the American Centers and Corners programs. While going through the abandoned offices, he found this USIS seal which represents the United States’ legacy of public diplomacy activities throughout Russia in the 20th century. Transfer from U.S. Embassy Moscow via U.S. Embassy London
Wooden Gourd Instrument with Brass Accents
Gift of His Excellency Salaheddine Mezouar, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of the Kingdom of Morocco 4/4/2014 Meetings in Rabat, Morocco This replica of a traditional Moroccan instrument was a gift to Secretary of State John Kerry on the occasion of his meeting in Rabat with Foreign Minister Salaheddine Mezouar for the second round of talks of the U.S.-Morocco Strategic Dialogue. The Strategic Dialogue started in 2012 as a means to strengthen the bilateral partnership in areas of economic, security, and cultural interests.
African Headrest
2014 Washington, DC The Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) is a Department of State-sponsored effort to invest in the next generation of African leaders. Launched in 2010, YALI supports young Africans’ efforts to generate economic prosperity, strengthen democratic governance, and enhance peace and security across Sub-Saharan Africa. YALI includes a fellowship program, an online community, and regional leadership training. The fellowship program was announced in 2013, and the inaugural class of YALI fellows arrived in the U.S. in 2014. For six intensive weeks, the fellowship connects young African leaders to training opportunities at some of America’s top universities to expand their leadership skills and knowledge. At the end of their training, the inaugural 2014 class also attended a Presidential Summit in Washington, DC, where President Obama announced that the fellowship was going to be named after the late South African leader Nelson Mandela. Mandela Washington Fellows are between 25 and 35 years old, have proven track records of leadership in a public, private, or civic organization, and demonstrate a strong commitment to contributing their skills and talents to building and serving their communities. The first class of Mandela Fellows represented all 49 countries in sub-Saharan Africa and included equal numbers of men and women. As a token of their appreciation, the 2014 YALI Mandela Fellows from Ghana give this headrest to the Department of State. It is made of all recycled materials and is in the shape of a traditional African headrest. Transfer from the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
Camel Bag
2016 Sudan This colorful woven camel bag (or travel bag) was a gift to Ambassador Jerry P. Lanier on the occasion of his departure as Chargé d’Affaires at U.S. Embassy Khartoum and in appreciation for his service while in Sudan. It was a gift from Issam al Sheik, an entrepreneur and leader of the Batahin tribe in Sudan. Gift of Ambassador Jerry P. Lanier and Dr. Catherine Kanneberg
Carnival Costume Bodice
Carnival Costume Head Dress
“Dancing” Dragon
Gift of Akiota City, Japan, during G7 Foreign Ministerial meetings 4/10/2016 in Hiroshima, Japan This playful dragon has its own stage and batteries that make it “dance” for the audience. It was received during Secretary of State John Kerry’s April 2016 visit to Japan. He met with foreign ministers from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the United Kingdom, known as the Group of 7 or G7, in Hiroshima and nearby Akiota City. The group reaffirmed their commitment to seeking a safer world free of nuclear weapons in a way that promotes international stability and peaceful uses of nuclear energy.
Floral Orthodox Easter Egg
Gift of His Excellency Leonid Kozhara, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine 5/10/2013 Visit at the Department of State During his first meeting with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Kozhara, Secretary of State John Kerry discussed bilateral issues including security, trade, and economic relations as well as the Ukrainian Chairmanship in the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) at the time.
2016 Collections Highlights
Germany Basic Handbook
Published by the British Ministry of Economic Warfare in July 1944, this handbook was a resource for soldiers and civilians posted in occupied Germany after WWII. American diplomat Arthur Tienken used this handbook while serving in the Kreis Resident Officer Program. Resident Officers were U.S. representatives posted throughout Germany. They developed relations with the local populations and assisted in the transition from a post-war U.S.-occupied government to one under German control. Gift of the Family of Ambassador Arthur T. Tienken
Award, Diplomatic Passport, and Day Planner
Foreign Service Officer Michael Hoyt received the prestigious Secretary’s Award after enduring 111 days in captivity in the Congo in 1964. He was serving as Principal Officer at the U.S. Consulate Stanleyville when he and his staff were taken hostage by the rebel Simbas. They were narrowly rescued in a joint U.S.-Belgian operation on November 24, 1964. His diplomatic passport from this era marks his return to the U.S. and freedom, and his day planner shows where he marked each day of captivity. (Photo 1/3) Gift of Michael P.E. Hoyt
Award, Diplomatic Passport, and Day Planner
Foreign Service Officer Michael Hoyt received the prestigious Secretary’s Award after enduring 111 days in captivity in the Congo in 1964. He was serving as Principal Officer at the U.S. Consulate Stanleyville when he and his staff were taken hostage by the rebel Simbas. They were narrowly rescued in a joint U.S.-Belgian operation on November 24, 1964. His diplomatic passport from this era marks his return to the U.S. and freedom, and his day planner shows where he marked each day of captivity. (Photo 2/3) Gift of Michael P.E. Hoyt
Award, Diplomatic Passport, and Day Planner
Foreign Service Officer Michael Hoyt received the prestigious Secretary’s Award after enduring 111 days in captivity in the Congo in 1964. He was serving as Principal Officer at the U.S. Consulate Stanleyville when he and his staff were taken hostage by the rebel Simbas. They were narrowly rescued in a joint U.S.-Belgian operation on November 24, 1964. His diplomatic passport from this era marks his return to the U.S. and freedom, and his day planner shows where he marked each day of captivity. (Photo 3/3) Gift of Michael P.E. Hoyt
“Kitchen Cabinet” Certificate
U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev famously debated the merits of communism versus capitalism while on a tour of the American National Exhibition in Moscow in 1959, pausing at the display of a modern kitchen. U.S. Embassy Moscow Public Affairs Officer Hans Tuch accompanied Nixon on this tour and provided impromptu translation for Khrushchev at one point during the tour. Tuch was awarded this unique tongue-in-cheek certificate afterwards. Gift of Hans N. Tuch
Man Portable Air Defense System (MANPADS)
This inert SA7 model of a Man Portable Air Defense System is an example of a type of conventional weapon removed under programs funded by the U.S. Department of State. These programs support foreign governments’ efforts to remove, secure, and/or destroy these weapons that threaten the health and security of their citizens. Transfer from the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
Men’s Fedora
Special Agent Frank J. Madden served with the Office of Security from January 1942 until 1971. He served on personal protective details for three Secretaries of State (Acheson, Dulles and Herter) and countless visits by high-level foreign dignitaries, such as the Shah of Iran and the King of Morocco. Madden wore this fedora while on the job, reflecting the style for men of his era. Transfer from the Bureau of Diplomatic Security
Sinai Field Mission Uniform
After the 1973 war between Egypt and Israel, Israel withdrew from the strategic Giddi Pass and Mitla Pass in the Sinai Peninsula in exchange for monitoring by third parties. The United States established the Sinai Field Mission (SFM) to monitor the number of personnel, weapons, and vehicles that were going into the Israeli camp on one end or the Egyptian camp on the other end. SFM officers at times wore this bright orange uniform as they carried out their duties on this desert frontier. Gift of Tucker R. Stewart
Souvenir Polaroid Photograph
On July 24, 1959, the United States opened the American National Exhibition at Sokolniki Park in Moscow. The Soviets and Americans had agreed to host national exhibitions as a means of cultural exchange to increase mutual understanding. More than 2 million people attended and heard American guides describing technology such as washing machines, chrome-laden cars, and Polaroid cameras. This Polaroid souvenir was one of various keepsakes available to exhibition visitors. (Photo 1/3) Gift from the Family of Dr. Charles T. Vetter
Souvenir Polaroid Photograph
On July 24, 1959, the United States opened the American National Exhibition at Sokolniki Park in Moscow. The Soviets and Americans had agreed to host national exhibitions as a means of cultural exchange to increase mutual understanding. More than 2 million people attended and heard American guides describing technology such as washing machines, chrome-laden cars, and Polaroid cameras. This Polaroid souvenir was one of various keepsakes available to exhibition visitors. (Photo 2/3) Gift from the Family of Dr. Charles T. Vetter
Souvenir Polaroid Photograph
On July 24, 1959, the United States opened the American National Exhibition at Sokolniki Park in Moscow. The Soviets and Americans had agreed to host national exhibitions as a means of cultural exchange to increase mutual understanding. More than 2 million people attended and heard American guides describing technology such as washing machines, chrome-laden cars, and Polaroid cameras. This Polaroid souvenir was one of various keepsakes available to exhibition visitors. (Photo 3/3) Gift from the Family of Dr. Charles T. Vetter
Spent Tear Gas Canister
U.S. Ambassador to Paraguay Clyde Taylor served during the rule of an anti-democratic and hostile government in the late 1980s. While attending a pro-democracy reception at a private residence on February 10, 1987, the Paraguayan police lobbed this tear gas canister into the garden in his vicinity. Ambassador Taylor and others suffered eye irritation, but no serious injuries. Gift of Ambassador Clyde D. Taylor
Toy Cars
What might just seem like toy cars are actually effective diplomatic training aids. Diplomatic Security Agent Patti Morton utilized these toy cars as part of her duties to train employees at U.S. Embassy Saigon in the art of defensive driving, demonstrating various scenarios which a diplomat might encounter on the road. Gift of Patti Morton
Clutch
This clutch was used by Patricia Morton, recruited to be the first female Diplomatic Security Agent, to carry her .357 Magnum pistol while assigned to the Washington field office in the early 1970s. She weathered the difficult transition from an all-male service to one that included women. At the time, Diplomatic Security did not issue gear for women to hold their weapons. Ms. Morton found her own solution by using this clutch. Gift of Patti Morton
Stamp, U.S. Embassy Taipei (pre-1979)
From 1949 to 1979, U.S. official diplomatic relations with China were based in Taipei, Formosa (Taiwan). Years after Nixon’s opening with mainland China in 1972, the United States recognized and established diplomatic relations with the People’s Republic of China as the sole legitimate government of China on January 1, 1979. The U.S. embassy in Taipei was then closed and the U.S. Liaison Office in Beijing was converted to an embassy. This stamp from the former U.S. Embassy Taipei marks this change in bilateral relations. Gift of Ambassador Pamela J. Slutz
U.S. Flag, U.S. Embassy Havana
The U.S. and Cuba re-established official diplomatic relations on July 20, 2015, and U.S. Embassy Havana was officially reopened on August 14, 2015, by Secretary of State John Kerry. During the reopening ceremony, this U.S. flag was handed off by the last Marines to serve at U.S. Embassy Havana in 1961 to the active duty Marines posted there. It was raised and flew for several weeks at the embassy before being replaced. Transfer from U.S. Embassy Havana
Montecristo Humidor
The U.S. and Cuba re-established official diplomatic relations on July 20, 2015, and U.S. Embassy Havana was officially reopened on August 14, 2015, by Secretary of State John Kerry. Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Eduardo Rodríguez Parrilla gave Secretary Kerry this wooden Montecristo humidor containing 39 Cuban cigars, matches, and a cigar cutter to commemorate this historic event.
Game-used First Base
This base was in play during innings 4 through 6 of the March 22, 2016, exhibition game between the Tampa Bay Rays and the Cuban National Team at Estadio Latinoame, Havana, Cuba. U.S. President Barack Obama and his family and Cuban President Raoul Castro attended the game. The game occurred during Obama’s historic visit to Cuba after the two countries re-established official diplomatic relations in 2015. Gift of Major League Baseball
Signed Commemorative Baseball
This ball is signed by the Tampa Bay Rays players who participated in the March 22, 2016, exhibition game between the Rays and the Cuban National Team at Estadio Latinoame, Havana, Cuba. U.S. President Barack Obama and his family and Cuban President Raoul Castro attended the game. The game occurred during Obama’s historic visit to Cuba after the two countries re-established official diplomatic relations in 2015. Gift of Major League Baseball
Booklet, USSR Exhibition, New York, 1959
In the late 1950s, the United States and the Soviet Union agreed to host national exhibitions as a means of cultural exchange to increase mutual understanding. The Soviet exhibition came first to New York City in June 1959. As seen on this booklet’s cover, the focus of their exhibition was the Soviet satellite Sputnik. Their exhibition also covered Soviet industry, agriculture, and music and theater. Gift of Beverly Payeff-Masey
Pamphlet “A Job Worth Training For”
This circa 1950 publication distributed to U.S. Department of State employees emphasizes the importance of training in achieving the overall goals of the agency. Required training included: introduction to the Department for new employees, formal class instruction at FSI, on the job training by supervisors, intern programs, and counseling for outside educational opportunities. The signature of Deputy Undersecretary of State for Management at the time, John E. Peurifoy, is on the first page. (Photo 1/2) Gift of Jonathan Schaefer
Pamphlet “A Job Worth Training For”
This circa 1950 publication distributed to U.S. Department of State employees emphasizes the importance of training in achieving the overall goals of the agency. Required training included: introduction to the Department for new employees, formal class instruction at FSI, on the job training by supervisors, intern programs, and counseling for outside educational opportunities. The signature of Deputy Undersecretary of State for Management at the time, John E. Peurifoy, is on the first page. (Photo 2/2) Gift of Jonathan Schaefer
Chart with Family Trees
Diplomats sometimes must be well-versed in political family relationships. This large chart was created by Foreign Service Officer James Nach in the early 1970s while serving as a Political Officer at U.S. Embassy Saigon. He created the chart to track inter-family connections of Vietnamese President Thieu and his prime minister in order to understand local politics. This chart was one of three items salvaged from the embassy and carried onboard the last helicopter to evacuate the U.S. embassy on April 30, 1975. Gift of James Nach
Chinese-English Flashcards
All U.S. Foreign Service Chinese Language Officers were trained in Peking (Beijing) from 1902 until 1949 when U.S. diplomatic and consular representation on China’s mainland ceased. This set of over 2,000 handmade Chinese-English flash cards stored in a custom decorative box was used by a U.S. Foreign Service Officer assigned to Peking in 1934 in order to acquire language skills vital for his diplomatic duties. Gift of William J. Cunningham and Kedzie Penfield
Cocaine Press
This press was recovered in 2013 by the Counter-Drug Brigade of the Colombian Army in Timbiqui, Cauca. The operation, supported by the U.S. Department of State and the Drug Enforcement Agency, dismantled a laboratory and confiscated five metric tons of cocaine that was finished and ready for transport. This press takes “base” cocaine, which can be produced in a maceration pit and then processed and refined, and forms it into a 1 kilogram brick of finished product. Transfer from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement
Commemorative Plaque
Though the Hanford, Washington nuclear reactor has been disabled since 1987, the site falls under the U.S.-Russian Plutonium Production Reactor Agreement (PPRA) of 1997. The Agreement requires that production of plutonium in both countries for use in nuclear weapons must completely cease, and also calls for reciprocal monitoring of U.S. and Russian reactors. The Department of Energy presented this plaque with a disabled zone temperature monitor control panel to Dr. Dan Fenstermacher and other members of the delegation after a monitoring visit to Hanford in 1998. Donated by Dr. Dan Fenstermacher, Department of State, appointed U.S. Co-chair to the Joint Implementation and Compliance Commission for the PPRA in December 2012
Copper Figurine Clock
This copper clock with figurines was a gift to U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III from Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze. Their tenures as their nation’s top diplomats saw great changes in the status of the U.S.-USSR bilateral relationship and the eventual collapse of the Soviet Union. Transfer from the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum
Customized Rubik’s Cubes
These cubes were presented by Under Secretary of State Wendy Sherman to U.S. members of the administration and delegation involved in the negotiations of the Iran nuclear agreement of 2015. The agreement’s substantive topics are labeled on each side. Ambassador Sherman likened the negotiations to solving this puzzle – all the pieces must fit together before it’s solved. “Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed,” she would often tell reporters. Gift of Ambassador Wendy R. Sherman
Damaged briefcase
Foreign Service Officer Richard A. Johnson was posted to U.S. Embassy Kuwait when the embassy suffered a major attack on December 12, 1983. A truck laden with explosives crashed through the embassy compound gates and detonated near the administrative building. Six people were killed and over 80 were injured. It was part of a series of attacks on sites in Kuwait including the French embassy. Richard Johnson was not injured, though his damaged briefcase was found amid the destroyed building. Gift of Rosita Johnson
Duty Officer Log Book
An embassy duty officer must handle emergencies of all kinds and provide various types of assistance to American citizens in the host country. This green ledger log book contains notes written by U.S. Embassy Rabat duty officers over three decades (1968-1998) and shows the vital role of a duty officer for embassy operations. (1/2) Transfer from U.S. Embassy Rabat, Morocco
Duty Officer Log Book
An embassy duty officer must handle emergencies of all kinds and provide various types of assistance to American citizens in the host country. This green ledger log book contains notes written by U.S. Embassy Rabat duty officers over three decades (1968-1998) and shows the vital role of a duty officer for embassy operations. (2/2) Transfer from U.S. Embassy Rabat, Morocco
Eyeglasses
These eyeglasses were worn by U.S. Embassy Tehran employee Kathleen Stafford as part of her disguise during a covert CIA operation to exfiltrate her and five other U.S. Embassy employees from Iran on January 28, 1980. Known as the “Canadian Six,” they were sheltered in homes of Canadian Embassy officials in Tehran after they avoided capture by Iranian militants who overran the U.S. Embassy on November 4, 1979. The CIA operation was dramatized in the popular 2012 film Argo. Gift of Kathleen Stafford
Fulani Staff, Hat, and Dress
John Campbell served as U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria from 2004-2007. The Fulani herdsmen community of northern Nigeria gave him this herdsman’s staff, hat, and dress after the Office of Defense Cooperation at the embassy drilled a water borehole in their village, providing a vital resource in a rural and arid environment. Gift of Ambassador John Campbell
2015 Collections Highlights
Message on handkerchief to President Obama
Cuban medical professional and human rights activist Óscar Elías Biscet wrote this message in 2009 while serving a 25 year prison sentence for his public support of human rights in Cuba. Biscet was released in 2011 after appeals from the United Nations, foreign governments, and international human rights organizations. Transfer from U.S. Embassy Havana.
Consular stamps, former U.S. Interests Section, Havana
A few of these stamps feature the seal of the Swiss embassy, under whose diplomatic auspices the Interests Section operated from 1977 to 2015. The U.S. and Cuba resumed diplomatic relations on July 20, 2015, when both countries elevated their respective Interests Sections to Embassy status. Transfer from U.S. Embassy Havana.
Wool women’s suit, worn by Ambassador Prudence Bushnell
This suit is stained with Ambassador Bushnell’s blood from the injuries she sustained during the August 7, 1998, attack on U.S. Embassy Nairobi, Kenya. The bomb detonated at the embassy also destroyed the adjacent building where Ambassador Bushnell was meeting with Kenyan counterparts. Gift of Ambassador Prudence Bushnell.
Concrete fragment of destroyed U.S. Embassy Nairobi, Kenya
The US Embassy Nairobi building was destroyed in the August 7, 1998, Al-Qaeda bombing. The force of the explosion blew this fragment into the vehicle of embassy employee Bonita Estes. Gift of Bonita Estes.
U.S. Information Service sign, former USIS Jakarta library
USIS and its libraries are important to the history U.S. public diplomacy. President Barack Obama (as a child living in Jakarta) is said to have visited the USIS library in Jakarta on many occasions while his mother was working at the U.S. Embassy. Gift of Michael H. Anderson.
U.S. Minister Flag
This unique flag was presented to Ambassador Harry Gilmore in 1991 upon completion of his assignment as U.S. Minister, Berlin. After German reunification, the U.S. embassy returned to Berlin from Bonn, and the position of U.S. Minister to Berlin was dissolved. The box’s inscription reads: "America Saved Its Best For Last". Gift of Carol Gilmore in memory of Harry J. Gilmore.
Book, "USINT Havana Recipes 1994"
In the early 1990s, Cubans suffered chronic shortages during what became known as the “Special Period” following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the economic assistance upon which they depended. Created by employees of the U.S. Interests Section Havana, this recipe book provided ideas using the scant ingredients available at market. Gift of Judith Bryan.
Order of Merit of Berlin medallion and rosette
This high German honor was presented to Ambassador Harry Gilmore, U.S. Minister to Berlin, in 1991 for “outstanding contributions to the state of Berlin.” The medallion is in the shape of the Maltese cross with the coat of arms of Berlin in center. Gift of Carol Gilmore in memory of Harry J. Gilmore.
Selection of holiday cards sent by Secretaries Powell, Rice, and Kerry (clockwise from top)
The Secretary of State sends a holiday card to foreign ministers and foreign ambassadors posted in the U.S. A protocol officer designs the card keeping in mind the tastes of the Secretary and utilizing objects from the Diplomatic Reception Rooms. Transfer from the Office of Protocol.
Arochukwu textile
U.S. Ambassador to Nigeria Robin Renee Sanders received this textile as part of a chieftaincy ceremony in which she was named “Adamazi.” Gift of Ambassador Robin Renee Sanders.
Plaque presented to Ambassador Joseph Melrose
Joseph Melrose served as U.S. Ambassador to Sierra Leone from 1998 to 2001. During this troubled period, he brokered the Lomé Peace Accord that brought an end to hostilities and also secured humanitarian aid for Sierra Leone. This plaque from Kissy Microcredit commemorates his service. Gift of Andrew Melrose.
U.S. Passport issued to Hulda Euebuske, 1918
The 25-year-old nurse was traveling to France for service with the Harvard surgical unit, a group that worked in hospitals to provide care for wounded World War One soldiers. Enebuske appears in her nurse’s uniform in her passport photo. Transfer from the San Francisco Passport Agency.
Booklet, “Life and Love in the Foreign Service” 1969
Published by the American Foreign Service Association, the author combines still frames from old black and white films with fabricated quotes, poking a little fun at common situations and challenges faced by members of the Foreign Service. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Selection of items from a Civilian Response Corps “go bag”
The Civilian Response Corps brings together employees of federal agencies, primarily Department of State and USAID, who are trained and equipped to deploy rapidly to provide reconstruction and stabilization assistance to countries in crisis or emerging from conflict. Transfer from the Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations.
Porcelain tea service
This tea service features the faces of “Madeleine and Her Dream Team,” Secretary Albright and six of her foreign minister counterparts: Igor Ivanov (Russia), Robin Cook (United Kingdom), Hubert Vedrine (France), Joschka Fischer (Germany), Lloyd Axworthy (Canada), and Lamberto Dini (Italy). It was presented to Secretary Albright by Ivanov in 2001. Gift of Madeleine Albright.
Consular wax seal stamp
This device was used for making wax impressions of the Great Seal at U.S. Consulate General Hamburg, Germany until 2007 when the consular section of the Consulate closed. Transfer from U.S. Embassy Berlin.
Suit and tie worn by Ambassador William vanden Heuvel
On April 30, 1980, Trotskyite protestors attacked the Ambassador and his Soviet counterpart with red paint at the United Nations Security Council. The motivation for the attack was to show that the U.S. and the USSR were the principal war mongers in the world. Gift of Ambassador William vanden Heuvel.
USAID Chlorine Dispeneser
Chlorine dispenser. These chlorine dispensers are a project of USAID’s Global Development Lab and are distributed in Kenya and Uganda. They provide liquid chlorine that purifies water for 24 hours, thereby reducing the instances of water borne illnesses such as diarrhea. “Maji Salama, Maisha Bora” means “Clean Water, Better Life.” Transfer from the U.S. Agency for International Development.
Damaged Great Seal
This large metal Great Seal was located at the entrance to the U.S. Consulate Herat, Afghanistan (now closed), and was damaged during the September 13, 2013, attack on the consulate by a truck bomb. Eight Afghan guards lost their lives defending the Consulate during this attack. Transfer from the U.S. Embassy, Afghanistan.
Podium seal, former U.S. Interests Section Havana, Cuba
After U.S.-Cuba diplomatic relations were severed in 1961, the U.S. maintained a presence in Havana through an Interests Section from 1977 to 2015. The U.S. and Cuba resumed diplomatic relations on July 20, 2015, when both countries elevated their respective Interests Sections to Embassy status. Transfer from U.S. Embassy Havana.
2014 Collections Highlights
Last issue of America Magazine
Final issue of America Illustrated, a Russian-language magazine produced by the U.S. Information Agency (USIA) from 1956-1994. The cover photo is a play on the cover of the magazine’s first issue, which featured a young girl in a red dress standing on a beach. Gift of Domenick DiPasquale.
2004 APEC meeting I.D. card and lanyard
2004 APEC meeting I.D. card and lanyard, issued to Foreign Service officer Barbara Nielsen. APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) is the premier forum for facilitating economic growth, cooperation, trade and investment in the Asia-Pacific region; the U.S. is one of APEC’s 21 members. Gift of Barbara H. Nielsen.
50th anniversary of the Fulbright Program in Greece T-shirt.
T-shirt marking 50th anniversary of the Fulbright Program in Greece. Operating since 1948, it is the oldest Fulbright Program in Europe. The Fulbright Program’s international educational exchanges – sponsored by the U.S. government – aim to increase mutual understanding between the people of the U.S. and the people of other countries. Gift of Barbara H. Nielsen.
“USA History in Brief” booklet
“USA History in Brief” booklet, produced in 2007 by the State Department’s Bureau of International Information Programs (IIP). This booklet is one of many publications created by IIP for foreign audiences, to promote understanding by acquainting them with U.S. history and culture. Gift of Domenick DiPasquale.
1988 USIS Election night ballot
Invitation (top) and ballot (bottom) for 1988 U.S. election day program at the U.S. Information Service (USIS)’s American Center in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. Attendees were able to “cast their ballots” (printed on the back of their invitations) in favor of the Democratic or Republican candidates for U.S. president. Gift of Domenick DiPasquale.
State Department Murders book
State Department Murders novel by Edward Ronns, published in 1950. The story revolves around a fictional State Department officer, Barney Cornell. Gift of Howard Betts.
State Department Comic Strip
“The Story Behind the State Department” comic, from True Comics #75, published February 1949. True Comics was an educational comic book for children that portrayed government and historical figures rather than superheroes. Gift of Howard Betts.
Schnare Passport
Diplomatic passport issued to U.S. Consul Lester L. Schnare, 1920. He used this passport for 19 years – until 1939 – and filled several pages with stamps and visas. During this period, Schnare served as a Consul in Japan, China, Colombia, Germany, and Italy. Gift of Belinda Johnson.
Schnare German ID card
Diplomatic identification card issued to U.S. Consul Lester L. Schnare in Hamburg, Germany, 1935. Identification documents of various types are frequently issued by host governments to resident diplomats. Gift of Belinda Johnson.
Terrorism: Avoidance & Survival booklet
“Terrorism: Avoidance and Survival” booklet, published in 1986 by the Foreign Service Institute, U.S. Department of State. Aimed at Foreign Service Officers and others working and living abroad, the booklet provides detailed guidance on avoiding and surviving terrorism. Gift of Domenick DiPasquale.
Scissors from ribbon-cutting of Bot-Zam highway
Scissors from ceremonial ribbon-cutting of the Bot-Zam highway, 1977. The highway linked Botswana with Zambia, providing a vital connection between Botswana and its only majority-ruled neighbor in an era of apartheid. U.S. ambassador Donald R. Norland performed the ribbon-cutting. Pictured: presentation box exterior (top) and open box with scissors (bottom). Gift of Patricia D. Norland
Reagan 1987 Berlin speech folder
Program folder from President Ronald Reagan’s June 1987 visit to Berlin, Germany. During this visit, President Reagan delivered one of his most memorable speeches, which included the famous line “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!” Gift of Fletcher M. Burton.
USAID Field Ops Guide
U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Field Operations Guide, 2005. A guidebook/reference tool developed by USAID for individuals sent to disaster sites as a member of a Disaster Response Team. Transfer from the U.S. Agency for International Development.
USAID personal hygiene kit items
Items from personal hygiene kit, c. 2014. A “personal hygiene kit” is a box of basic hygiene supplies, utilized by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance to help prevent outbreaks of communicable illness in disaster areas across the globe. Transfer from the U.S. Agency for International Development.
USAID kitchen set items
Items from kitchen set, c. 2014. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance distributes basic cooking and serving utensils in disaster areas, as part of efforts to maintain health and cleanliness when disasters strike – helping prevent outbreaks of communicable illness. Transfer from the U.S. Agency for International Development.
USAID Dog Vest
Dog/K9 vest, c. 2014. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)’s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance partners with internationally-certified urban search and rescue teams – such as the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department – to bring needed K9 units to disaster areas. Vests such as this one are worn by K9 units during search-and-rescue efforts. Transfer from the U.S. Agency for International Development.
President George H.W. Bush Australia trip book
“Trip book” from President George H.W. Bush’s trip to Australia at the end of 1991. Trip books like this are used by U.S. diplomats during foreign travel by high-level officials and other important events, so the numerous participants know all the important “who, what, where and when” details of the trip. Gift of Domenick DiPasquale.
Section of sidewalk from outside of U.S. Embassy Saigon
Section of sidewalk from outside U.S. Embassy Saigon, South Vietnam. In 1968, when the Embassy was attacked, State Department security officers and U.S. troops skirmished with attackers on the sidewalk, which surrounded the Embassy compound’s outer wall. Gift of James Nach.
2013 Collections Highlights
Civil Operations and Revolutionary Development Support (CORDS) Plaque
Plaque honoring the service of USAID Officer David Lazar, from his colleagues of the Civil Operations and Revolutionary Development Support (CORDS) Advisory Team 18, Vietnam, 1971. Gift of Valerie Estes.
Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty Ceramic Mug
Ceramic mug featuring a forest design that disappears when a warm drink is poured, revealing a missile. Created circa 1988, commemorating the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty. Gift of Timothy Tulenko.
Spherical Glass and Metal Container
Spherical glass and metal container. Gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Turkish Prime Minister H.E. Mr. Recep Erdoğan.
Framed Exequaturs Signed by Indonesian President Soeharto
Framed Exequaturs signed by Indonesian President Soeharto (Suharto), belonging to a family of Foreign Service Officers: father Robert Slutz (1970), daughter Pamela Slutz (1986), and husband Ronald Deutch (1986). Gift of Ambassador Pamela J. Slutz.
Framed and signed copies of the first e-mail exchange between Heads of State
Framed and signed copies of the first e-mail exchange between Heads of State– Swedish Prime Minister Carl Bildt and U.S. President Bill Clinton, Feb. 4-5th, 1994. Gift of the Embassy of Sweden.
Sculpture of a Flower Vendor
Sculpture of a flower vendor in wood and silver. Gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Peruvian President Ollanta Humala.
Miniature Saddle
Miniature saddle. Gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Mongolian Prime Minister Sukhbaatar Batbold, July 9, 2012.
Statuette of a Falcon
Statuette of a falcon. Gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Kuwaiti Prime Minister His Highness Sheikh Nasser Mohammed Al Ahmed Al-Sabah, September 29, 2011.
Cococho
The Government of Peru’s eradication agency, CORAH, uses an innovative tool known as the cococho for manual eradication of the coca plant, the only required ingredient for cocaine. Senior Eradication Advisor Francisco “Paco” Alvarez developed the cococho while serving in Bolivia in the late 1990s. Transfer from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, Department of State.
Diplomatic Corps Identification Card
Diplomatic corps identification card (in Spanish), issued in Caracas, Venezuela, August 9, 1956, to Foreign Service Officer Herbert W. Baker. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Ambassador's Car Flags
Car flags used during Ambassador Edward Marks’ service in Guinea-Bissau, 1977-1980. Gift of Ambassador Edward Marks.
Silver Tray Engraved with Signatures
Silver tray engraved with signatures of Washington, DC foreign Chiefs of Mission, given to Secretary of State Dean Acheson upon his retirement, January 1953. Gift of David C. Acheson.
White Porcelain Medallion with bas-relief of Brandenburg Gate
White porcelain medallion with bas-relief of Brandenburg Gate and “BERLIN”. Gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from German Foreign Minister Dr. Guido Westerwelle, at NATO meetings, April 13-15, 2011.
East German Flag
East German flag given to Foreign Service Officer Paul Denig, circa 1993, in gratitude for re-training Russian teachers into English teachers at the Teacher’s College of Magdeburg, Germany. Gift of Paul Denig.
Silver Jewelry Set
Silver jewelry set. Gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Yemen.
Silk Shawl and Silver Rice Container
Silk shawl and silver rice container. Gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Laotian Foreign Minister Thongloun Sisoulith.
Passport and Nationality Registration cards used by U.S. Embassy Moscow
Passport and Nationality Registration cards used by U.S. Embassy Moscow to record U.S. citizens living or traveling in the area, 1960s. Transfer from the Bureau of Consular Affairs, Department of State.
Decorated Lidded Silver Chalice
Decorated lidded silver chalice. Gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Burmese Minister of Foreign Affairs His Excellency U Wunna Maung Lwin.
Press Conference Transcript, May 13, 1958
Press conference transcript, May 13, 1958. Vice President Richard Nixon held this press conference on the day of his rocky reception in Venezuela, one of the stops on a “goodwill tour” through South America. Rioters spat upon and attacked Nixon’s motorcade. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
2012 Collections Highlights
Kerosene Slide Projector
Kerosene-powered slide projector from the U.S. Embassy in Singapore – an unusual device dating to the 1950s that diplomats used to show slides or film strips in areas with limited or no electricity. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Kissinger Ping Pong Paddle
Ping pong paddle given to former Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger by Chinese table tennis champion Zhuang Zedong in 2007. Zhuang’s chance encounter with a member of the U.S. table tennis team in 1971 led to the “ping pong diplomacy” with China of the early 1970s. Gift of Dr. Henry Kissinger.
Tagine Dish
Hand-painted tagine dish manufactured in Korba, Tunisia and featured in a January 2012 U.S. Embassy Tunis, Tunisia “Doing Business with the U.S.A.” roadshow. The roadshow promoted a program that allows this tagine dish and other products to be imported to the U.S. duty-free, an effort aimed at helping develop the Tunisian handicrafts sector. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Ambassador Crocker’s Damaged Commission
Foreign service commission promoting Ryan C. Crocker to the rank of Minister-Counselor, damaged when rioters broke into Ambassador Crocker’s official residence in Damascus, Syria in December 1998. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Resident Officer Handbook
“Resident Officer Handbook” given to Foreign Service Officers of the class of 1950, who were sent to Germany to aid in transitioning from the post-war U.S. Military government to a civilian German government. Gift of Marion Thompson, widow of Malcolm Thompson, Foreign Service Officer.
Cal Ripken, Jr. Jersey
Baseball jersey autographed by Hall of Famer Cal Ripkin Jr., a SportsUnited Public Diplomacy Envoy who has traveled abroad on behalf of the Department of State to put on baseball clinics and work with kids affected by disasters. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Secretary of State Albright Commission
Duplicate of the original appointment commission for Secretary of State Albright.
Secretary of State Powell Commission
Duplicate of the original appointment commission for Secretary of State Powell
Secretary of State Rice Commission
Duplicate of the original appointment commission for Secretary of State Rice
Constance Harvey’s Dog Tags
Dog tags that belonged to Foreign Service Officer Constance R. Harvey, one of the first women in the Foreign Service. Harvey was awarded the Medal of Freedom in 1947 for her meritorious service with the French Underground from 1941-1942. Her citation reads, in part: “Despite close surveillance by Gestapo agents and the French Vichy Militia, Miss Harvey continued her work … without which much valuable information would have been delayed and important missions would have been impossible.” Gift of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.
Congratulations letter/card to Joseph Grew
June 1927 “best wishes” letter to Undersecretary of State Joseph C. Grew upon his appointment as Ambassador to Turkey. Signed by Secretary of State Frank B. Kellog and nine pages’ worth of Grew’s State Department colleagues. Gift of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.
INF “wing tip” Missile Part
Wing tip from a ground-launched cruise missile destroyed at Davis-Montham Air Force Base in 1989 under the terms of the INF (Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces) Treaty, signed in 1987 by President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Gift of David Jones.
Embassy Colombo Records Book
“Miscellaneous Records Book” kept by the U.S. Embassy in Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). A May 1961 entry records the arrival of incoming Ambassador Frances E. Willis, who was the first female Foreign Service Officer to rise through the ranks to become an ambassador. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Hand-made Car Flag
Small hand-made U.S. flag (for flying on an official’s car) used by the government of Cape Verde during Ambassador Edward Marks’ presentation of credentials ceremony in October 1977. A factory-manufactured flag was not available, so protocol substituted one that was hand-stitched. Gift of Ambassador Edward Marks.
2nd FS Class Photo
Photograph of the 2nd Foreign Service class to graduate under the auspices of the Rogers Act of 1924, which merged the separate U.S. diplomatic and consular services into the combined Foreign Service. This photograph was taken in September 1925 on the steps of the State, War, and Navy Building (now the Eisenhower Executive Office Building) next door to the White House, upon the entry of this class into the service. They graduated in July 1926. Undersecretary Joseph C. Grew is pictured first row, third from the right. Gift of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.
Henry White’s Exhibition Pass
U.S. diplomat Henry White’s pass to visit the exhibition at the 1910 Pan-American Congress in Buenos Ares, Argentina. White, whose 30 year diplomatic career included serving as Ambassador to Italy and France, was once praised by President Theodore Roosevelt as “the most useful man in the entire diplomatic service.” Gift of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.
Photo of Near East Division’s Christmas Party
December 23, 1945 staff photo of the Department of State’s Near East Division gathered for a Christmas party. Loy W. Henderson, who was known as “Mr. Foreign Service” during the latter part of his long career, is pictured in the front row third from right. The Department of State’s main auditorium is named in Henderson’s honor. Gift of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.
Framed Oath of Office for Ambassador Douglas MacArthur, II
Framed oath of office for Ambassador Douglas MacArthur II. All Foreign Service Officers take an oath at the beginning of their careers and upon receiving higher appointments. MacArthur framed his oath of office for his appointment as Ambassador to Iran, 1969-1972. Gift of the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training.
U.S.-Russia Working Group on Afghanistan Certificate
Framed certificate commemorating a meeting of the U.S.-Russia Working Group on Afghanistan. The working group was convened in 2001 in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and represented the first significant joint effort between the U.S. and Russia on counter-terrorism. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
PRT Shoulder Patch
Shoulder patch from the Muthanna Province, Iraq PRT (Provincial Reconstruction Team). PRTs in Iraq were small teams of diplomats, military personnel, development experts, and other specialists who worked closely with Iraqis to stabilize and improve their communities. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Samuel Waller's 1859 Passport
1859 U.S. passport used by businessman Samuel Mills Waller of Connecticut. The unusual symbol at the top – an eagle with a lyre – was added to the U.S. passport design by Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, who served from 1817-1825. Adams developed the seal himself, which symbolizes the civilizing effect Orpheus (of ancient Greek mythology) and his lyre had on “savage man”. Gift of Stephen H. Grant, FSO, ret.
Silver Tray
Silver tray given to Chargé d’Affaires Lloyd M. Rives by General Lon Nol, Prime Minister of the Khmer Republic (Cambodia). Rives re-opened the Embassy in Phnom Penh, Cambodia’s capital, in August 1969 after it had been closed for more than four years. The ongoing war in neighboring Vietnam created challenges in the U.S.-Cambodian relationship during this period. Gift of John Rives.
Occidental Petroleum Co. Hard Hat
Occidental Petroleum Co. hard hat from the U.S. Ambassador to Oman’s tour of the Mukhaizna oil field. Occidental is the largest U.S. investment in Oman and has greatly increased productivity of the Mukhaizna oil field since taking it over in 2005. Occidental employs 70% of its Oman workforce from the local population. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
2011 Collections Highlights
Gold and Jeweled Pendant Necklace
Gold and jeweled pendant necklace, gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Papau New Guinea. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Sand Portrait of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton
Sand portrait of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, gift of Vietnam, 2010. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Shell-Shaped Pocket Watch
Shell-shaped pocket watch, gift of Japan to Secretary of State Clinton, 2010. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
U.S. Embassy Jumpsuit
Blue jumpsuit with gold sewn lettering on reverse, "American Embassy." Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Plaque from Kosovo
Plaque from Kosovo, commemorating independence, gift to Ambassador Tina Kaidanow. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
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Gift from the Coptic Church in Germany to the US Ambassador to Germany, 2010. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Georgian Parliamentary Election Observer Credentials
Credentials of FSO Melvin Arakaki to observe the Georgian Parliamentary elections, 2003. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Consular Exequatur
Consular Exequatur for FSO Julie L. Grant, Consul at La Paz, Bolivia, July 19, 2005. Signed by President George W. Bush and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Iran Hostage Welcome Home Button
Button welcoming home freed hostages from Iran, 1981. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Embassy Marine Security Uniform
Embassy Marine Security Guard uniform. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Russian Nesting Dolls
Russian nesting dolls, featuring U.S. Ambassador Robert Strauss and contemporaries (1991-1992). Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
Election Campaign Material, Philippines
Election campaign material, Philippines, 1980s. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Sculpture Made of Destroyed Soviet Missile Shrapnel
Sculpture made of destroyed Soviet missile shrapnel, 1990. Gift to Ambassador Eileen Malloy. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center. This is a small object that tells several stories. It was part of a missile destroyed in the former Soviet Union per the terms of the INF Treaty of 1988. This piece of a former weapon was turned into a beautiful piece of art, and presented as a gift to members of the U.S. delegation observing the destruction in 1990. This particular piece was a gift to Eileen Malloy, who was a trailblazer for female diplomats in the field of arms control. At the time, she was the chief of the arms control unit at U.S. Embassy Moscow.
USAID Water Can
Water can, from USAID, Laos. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Portable X-Ray Machine
Portable x-ray machine, used by Diplomatic Security. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Commemorative Medal
Commemorative medal, 1871, awarded to George F. Robinson for saving the life of Secretary of State Seward in 1865. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Peace Corps Suriname T-Shirt
T-shirt, Peace Corps in Suriname. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Commemorative medal
Commemorative medal, 1860, first Japanese embassy in the United States. Collections of the National Museum of American Diplomacy.
U.S. Women's Soccer Jersey
US Women's soccer jersey, personalized for Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, 2011. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.
Handmade Liberian Quilt
Handmade quilt, gift to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton from Liberia, 2010. Collections of the US Diplomacy Center.