Reducing Threats

Negotiations on Nuclear Weapons

In 1990, Foreign Service Officer Eileen Malloy traveled to Kazakhstan to witness the destruction of missiles under the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. (Collection of the National Museum of American Diplomacy)

Reducing Threats

Nuclear weapons are one of the greatest threats to world security.

American diplomats help reduce this threat by negotiating and implementing treaties and other agreements to control and eliminate nuclear weapons.

Foreign Service Officer Eileen Malloy was one of the few female diplomats working on arms control issues in the late 1980s. In 1988, she became the head of the new Arms Control Implementation Unit at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, which helped implement the terms of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty.

Eileen Malloy in the USSR

In 1990, Eileen Malloy and a U.S. inspection team were stranded for days in Siberia when their airplane broke down. Temperatures plummeted to negative 30 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving Malloy with frostbitten cheeks. (Collection of the National Museum of American Diplomacy)

When I arrived in Moscow to take on the huge challenge…I turned out to be a pregnant female. They just did not know what to do with me.”

– Eileen Malloy, Foreign Service Officer

Nuclear Negotiations

Foreign Service Officer Eileen Malloy and her colleagues worked to ensure the Soviet Union adhered to the terms of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. They traveled to remote areas of the country to verify that the Soviets had eliminated weapons systems.

Malloy negotiated with Soviet officials to obtain direct access to nuclear scientists and factories involved in missile production. Her efforts provided U.S. inspectors with the logistic and technical support needed to fulfill their mission. 

Reagan Gorbachev Signing INF treaty

Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and U.S. President Ronald Regan sign the landmark Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty in December 1987. (Courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Library)

Eileen Malloy monitoring station

Visiting a U.S. monitoring station

Eileen Malloy visits a U.S. monitoring station at the Soviet missile production city of Votkinsk, 800 miles east of Moscow, 1989. (Collection of the National Museum of American Diplomacy)

Missile Shrapnel

Arms Transformed into Art

Foreign Service Officer Eileen Malloy received this unique gift from a Soviet delegation at a nuclear missile destruction site in Kazakhstan. An artist transformed a missile fragment into a sculpture, symbolizing the hope for a more secure future. (Gift of Ambassador Eileen Malloy)